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Lost characters of Mad Men you say? No, these picturesque 60s fashion plates are my parents (mom and dad on the right) and my Aunt Kath with her first husband. The beehive, boggles the mind. I asked my mom how she achieved this seemingly impossible feat. She said, “Oh, lots of ratting and hairspray and then comb it over.” Yeah… I really don’t think I would have the patients.

Lost characters of Mad Men you say? No, these picturesque 60s fashion plates are my parents (mom and dad on the right) and my Aunt Kath with her first husband. The beehive, boggles the mind. I asked my mom how she achieved this seemingly impossible feat. She said, “Oh, lots of ratting and hairspray and then comb it over.” Yeah… I really don’t think I would have the patients.

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More cards. This time Jack Daniels. As you can tell gambling was a favorite pastime in our house.

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My Grandpa’s (Mom’s dad) wedding ring. When diamonds in a man’s wedding band were really popular. His name was Kenneth McIsaac, but the family called him Mac for short. He passed before I was born, so I never had the pleasure of meeting him, but I hear he was a really great man.

My Grandpa’s (Mom’s dad) wedding ring. When diamonds in a man’s wedding band were really popular. His name was Kenneth McIsaac, but the family called him Mac for short. He passed before I was born, so I never had the pleasure of meeting him, but I hear he was a really great man.

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Jackpot! This was about the only thing that I can remember taking completely apart and putting back together when I was little, in order to figure out how it worked, and, who am I kidding, to cheat to get all of the money. A gift from a family friend who used to work in Reno for a slot machine company, this little machine was intended to be a sort of piggy bank. Kind of ironic if you ask me.

Jackpot! This was about the only thing that I can remember taking completely apart and putting back together when I was little, in order to figure out how it worked, and, who am I kidding, to cheat to get all of the money. A gift from a family friend who used to work in Reno for a slot machine company, this little machine was intended to be a sort of piggy bank. Kind of ironic if you ask me.

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Creme de cacao. Vintage alcohol. I suppose this is no longer good to drink. Good to look at though.

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The consensus is that this book was given to my dad’s mom by a relative visiting from Finland. The Finnish language is very long, notice the hyphen in the title: that’s one word. The whole book is filled with words like this, most even longer. I love the illustration style on the front and the use of color. The inscription on the inside said this book was given to my grandmother on July 11, 1967 which happens to be the date of my dad’s older brother’s birthday. The mystery remains.

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His and hers oil. Sewing machine oil and tool oil that is.

His and hers oil. Sewing machine oil and tool oil that is.

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This was my great great Aunt Annie’s pillbox hat. J’adore the vintage bling on the front, and the label that says this was made with imported fur. Fancy c. 1940.

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Mr. Boston’s ‘deluxe’ Official Bartender’s Guide. It looks like Mr. Boston is a brand of liquor, so this seems to be a promotional book for the alcohol. Interesting none the less.

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Owl cards as a bridge set.

Owl cards as a bridge set.